Exclusive: Masaba Discusses Her First Demi-Couture Line for Satya Paul

Team MissMalini , 01 Aug 2013
Masaba (photo courtesy | India Today)
Masaba (photo courtesy | India Today)

Masaba has been creating buzz ever since she burst onto the scene at LFW. Her eponymous line has been lapped up by celebrities and since then she’s taken over one of India’s most iconic fashion houses – Satya Paul. Her debut line was deemed a hit. We sit down with her for a quick chat on the eve of her first ever demi-couture line for the house.

Satya Paul Demi Couture
Satya Paul Demi Couture

TeamMissMalini: Why did you want to introduce a couture line for Satya Paul?

Masaba Gupta (MG): It was a very natural progression, in fact we wondered why we never thought of it earlier! The brand is heading towards its 30th anniversary and this was definitely the next big step in developing three verticals, that of prêt, bridal and now Demi-Couture.

TeamMM: What exactly is Demi-Couture? Could you explain the term?

MG: The word “demi” means “half,” so “Demi-Couture” literally means “half-couture”. In the elaborate sense, it refers to “half-custom-made women’s clothing”. The idea of Satya Paul Demi-Couture is to build something that is far more intricate and detailed from our prêt, yet accessible when compared to haute couture.

Behind the scenes
Behind the scenes

TeamMM: How do you plan on incorporating the Satya Paul DNA into this collection?

MG: Print has been Satya Paul’s DNA and remains the core of our work. This could be the first time an Indian brand is presenting a capsule collection based entirely on engineered prints rather than traditional embroidery. Delicate renderings of florals have been X-rayed and highlighted through the use of selective embellishments.

TeamMM: What does your mood board look like right now?

MG: It’s a whole lot of x-rayed botanicals and pictures of Dita Von Teese!

Behind the scenes
Behind the scenes

TeamMM: Define the typical Satya Paul woman.

MG: I think that the typical Satya Paul woman is someone who wants to hold onto tradition, mixed with certain newness. She brings a modern spin to age old classics, as she pairs formal shirts with lehengas, tailcoat jackets with shararas and drapes a saree over her pants. Dressing up is fun, but she couldn’t be burdened with endless layers of fabric.

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