Here's Why Every Movie Buff Needs To Follow This Instagram Account

Priyanka Parmar , 17 Jan 2019
Deepika Padukone, Ranbir Kapoor, Shakti Kapoor (Source: Instagram | @characterbiopsies)
Deepika Padukone, Ranbir Kapoor, Shakti Kapoor (Source: Instagram | @characterbiopsies)

Movies have the power to transport us into another universe, be it a romantic fantasy or a sci-fi thriller. What makes amazing films truly great are the remarkable characters that these stories have – from a friendly character that you could swear you’ve known for years to a terrifying one that you hope you never come across in real life. I, for one, have always been drawn to characters that seem regular but are going through an internal fight of some other kind, for instance, Ved from Tamasha. Ranbir Kapoor did a fabulous job of bringing the various sides of Ved come to life on-screen. This is just one of the many characters that have left an impression on me. I am sure there are numerous other characters that you have fallen in love with. If you have, then you are going to thank us for introducing you to this new Instagram handle called @CharacterBiopsies. The bio reads, ‘analyzying characters’ and analyze it does! They break down each character’s journey throughout the film and it will make you re-live that experience. If you haven’t watched the character on screen, then I am sure you will have a deeper understanding of them when you do.

Here are some of the unforgettable characters featured on their feed:

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Cities have strong characters that are built on people and roads and buildings. In Wake-up Sid, Mumbai plays the role of a protagonist and narrator, both. When you are new to Mumbai, no matter where you come from, you feel intimidated. The city towers its presence on you and makes you realize how small and insignificant you are. Strangers here seem stranger than the strangers back home. And that is how Ayesha felt. When Ayesha and Sid meet for the first time, they take a walk on the city streets. Mumbai then is unfamiliar for Ayesha, but also comforting, and so is Sid. Ayesha asks Sid to show her his favorite place in Bombay, and he takes her to Marine Drive. Perhaps no other iconic spot is more relevant to the definition of Bombay than the Queen's Necklace (not even Gateway). The song 'Kya karu' shows how charmingly warm Mumbai is during the day, and how safe it is at night, even if you are not an adult. Barely anywhere else has the feel of this city been better romanticised For a city that is so crowded all the time, it is the deep nights that bring out its true soul. Sid feels the essence of Bombay while driving around the empty streets at night, and he comes out of the sunroof to breathe in the unadulterated air of his home; the air that is a concoction of sea breeze and nostalgia. Sid is a photographer and Bombay is his muse. He grew up in South Bombay but after moving in with Ayesha, he lives the suburban "Mumbai" life too, where luxuries are minimal and your next door neighbors aren't strangers. Bombay and Mumbai are two very distinct, unique cities in themselves. Bombay is cobbled streets, Gothic and Victorian buildings, Irani Cafes and promenades, whereas Mumbai is cramped houses with no balconies, local trains, Vada Pav, and Rickshaws. Both these cities, albeit the same, have very strong individual personalities. And in the end, the city plays its final card. The first rains nudge Sid and Ayesha towards each other, thus completing their love story. Every city has a specific Instagram-like filter during rains, and nowhere else on celluloid has the beauty of the monsoons of Mumbai been captured more realistically than in the climax of this movie.

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Meet Sartaj Singh. A Mumbai Cop struggling with a moral conundrum on a pretty much daily basis at his job. He pops sleeping pills like candy, is divorced, insomniac, and often seeks his mother out to calm his loneliness and internal turmoils. Sartaj grew up under the shadow of his dad who was an honest police officer, and once he wore the khakhi himself he realized much to his hatred and anger that the term 'Honest police officer' is an oxymoron. Sartaj is treated as an outcast by his own colleagues because of his moral standing. But Sartaj has never been a quitter. We see him breaking multiple times in the show, but never quitting, a trait he perhaps gets from his father. One more trait Sartaj inherits from his father is his goodness. And it is this very burden of being nice that weighs him down. Because for a man like this having a Police job, that too in a city like Mumbai, which at every point brings you face-to-face with the worst side of humanity is disheartening. Sartaj is the troublesome pupil that teachers find difficult to control because he is regularly doing things teachers have asked him not to. And the only reason why he has ever craved recognition at work is so that his mother could be proud of him. Sartaj's choices and actions are major forces that drive the story ahead, and these aren't easy for this character because in most circumstances he has to choose between being a good person and being a good cop. Sartaj isn't exactly a hero material going by the textbook definition of it. He is a middle-aged man who is flawed in many ways. But in the end, you can't help but hope that his life gets more endurable. . #sacredgames #characterbiopsies

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Meet Simi Sinha. Simi is beautifully dark. Her moral fabric is extremely thin, and she is one of those people for whom the means do not matter at all, as long as the ends are in their favor. Simi will transform from a scheming cold-blooded mastermind to a victim begging for mercy in a jiffy if it gets her what she wants. Simi's character draws parallels from that of Lady Macbeth in Shakespear's 'The Tragedy of Macbeth'. She lacks basic humanity, and for her, the outcome is far superior to the morality of the action leading to it. She is impulsive and eccentric, and will not think twice before tossing an elderly woman off a balcony just because that woman could have caused her some trouble. Simi married an out-of-work yesteryear actor who was mediocrely successful at best, to obtain wealth and a certain level of social status. And she continues feeding his fragile ego and self-importance by pretending to love him. Somewhere she did feel for him because we see her weep over his death. Simi also nurtures a small ambition of being an actress herself, which is one other reason why she would have married Pramod. The level of pretense in Simi's nature can be seen through her house. Simi and Pramod's apartment, at an interesting contrast to her malevolent nature, is bright and flowery, and rather positive. One might feel Simi is void of any emotion, which is true to a great extent. But there are moments when she shows shades of humanness, like the scene where she cries for Pramod and regrets that she had to kill him, and the one where she freezes a crab for a couple of hours before putting it in boiling water so that it doesn't have to suffer the pain and dies peacefully in its sleep. She also only blinds Akash in order to exact revenge, when she could have easily killed him as well. Simi Sinha is tastefully evil and Machiavellian, and she takes no prisoners as she goes about her business. #characterbiopsies #andhadhun

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Meet Ved. A storyteller trapped inside an everyday guy. Ved grew up being fascinated by stories, by the worlds they took him to. But due to societal and family pressures, he opted for the regular life and turned out to be yet another 'anybody'. Ved meets Tara on a vacation. He chooses the lesser known French island of Corsica as his vacation destination, because absolutely no one knows him or recognises him there. He puts on the personality of a movie character, Don, because this is his story. He is in control of it so he can choose whatever he wants to be. And that is where he finds his perfect aide, Tara, the girl who doesn't find it even a bit odd that the stranger she met talks to mountains. The Ved we meet 4 years later has strangled the Don within him to the point of unconsciousness. He is living the template life of waking up, having a morning routine, going to work at a corporate job, coming back home and going to sleep. Ved is always well dressed, well groomed and well mannered, as opposed to Don who wore casual clothes, didn't bother about shaving his beard, and was so uninhibitedly himself that he might have come across as mannerless. He and Tara start dating again, but there is an underlying sadness in their relationship now. And when Tara rejects his proposal, she makes him realise how pitiful a life he's leading right now. Right after, Ved has a chance encounter with a rickshaw driver, whose life story he instantly relates to. "Andar se kuch aur hi hain hum, aur bahar se majboor" These incidences trigger the awakening of Don inside Ved. But Ved is headstrong to continue living this boring life, because the society and his family have programmed him for that. And Don is howling and struggling to come out at every moment possible. This suppressed Don finds a major outlet when Ved is with Tara, because she sees the Don through Ved. And Ved hates being so naked in front of her, which is why he pushes her away. He rushes back to his childhood storyteller in Simla, begging him to help him end his story. But the storyteller dismisses him off saying that it's your story and you have to take it ahead. And that's what Ved does.

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Meet Michael Scott, Regional Manager of Dunder Mifflin Paper Company. Michael is one of the saddest characters out there, but it is beautifully masked under his jovial persona. Michael has had a difficult childhood. His father left them, and he hated his step-dad. And it can easily be concluded that he never had any friends, which is why he was the only person who was okay with having a despicable fellow like Todd Packer as his pal. Throughout the seven seasons, we never hear him mention any old time friend from school or childhood or his young days. And perhaps this is the reason why he became a sales guy, so that people would talk to him. Somewhere deep within, Michael Scott is a lonely, crying child. Michael treats every single person of his branch as his family. When he finds out that perhaps not everyone is genuinely fond of him, it bothers him and he meets with his old boss who tells him that your workers are workers, friends are friends and family is family. Don't mix them. But Michael doesn't understand this concept because he has no family or friends. Michael loves the spotlight, because no one ever gave him one, and now that he is manager people have no choice but to be his audience. To top that, there is a documentary crew with cameras on him all the time. So he lives these seven years more as a performer and less as himself. But the moments in which we see the real Michael Scott are the ones in which we truly love him. Like the time only he showed up to Pam's art exhibition and genuinely complimented her painting, and even bought it. One dream that Michael has always nurtured was that of being a father. And you can feel his pain when he finds out that Jan took away his chance of being a dad. "I want to get married and have 100 kids so I can have 100 friends and no one can say 'no' to b
eing my friend." And in the end, it makes you really happy to find out he is living the life he has always wanted. He has a second phone just so he could keep pictures of his kids in it, and that is not only heartening but also classic Michael Scott. As they say, it's okay to have a bumpy ride as long as it climaxes well (That's what she said) . #theoffice

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Meet Thanos, the quasi-hero. Thanos (as confirmed by the Russo Brothers in an interview) is about a thousand years old. In his humungous lifespan, he has seen a lot of destruction and depletion of resources. And all of this has brought him to believe that there are more lives in the universe than it can provide for. He witnessed it firsthand on his own planet and still grieves that he was helpless to stop it then. Thanos is not power hungry. Anyone else in possession of the six stones would only try to rule the galaxy, but not Thanos. He is not egotistical about being one of the most powerful beings in the universe, he is simply self-aware. During the battle on Titan, Thanos already had five infinity stones with him. He could have lain armies of Iron Men and Doctor Stranges to waste, yet all we see him try to do is to get them out of his way. He knows that they will not be convinced of his purpose, and he does not have the time to try. He also knows that every opponent of his is weaker than him, but he has the maturity to understand their motivations. He empathizes with Wanda when she has to kill Vision, someone she loves, as he had just done that sometime back. Thanos feels only he understands that the universe needs balance. He is "cursed with knowledge", which maybe is why he relates to Tony Stark. Tony, in Age of Ultron, was also the only one who realized that the world needed an armor to protect it. Thanos respects Stark and relates to his intent, which is why he hopes that Stark is remembered, as Thanos also hopes that he himself is remembered for his purpose. "I know what it's like to lose," he says, because he has lost a great deal while working towards his goal. "…to feel so desperately that you are right yet to fail all the same," because that is what happened with him on his own planet
, where they branded him a 'Mad Titan' because of his genocidal tendencies. The look on Thanos’s face at the end, sitting and watching the sunrise, conveyed more than just relief. It conveyed grief, loss and a sense of accomplishment. And it definitely did not convey victory or triumph because winning over Avengers was never his motive. . #avengersinfinitywar

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Meet Crime Master Gogo, a good guy desperately trying to be bad. Gogo was ushered into the world of crime due to family pressures. Nepotism gave him an easy entry, but he was never able to prove himself. Gogo has lived his entire life under the burden of the daunting persona that his uncle, Mogambo, was. Gogo isn't inherently bad. He is, in fact, a considerate and a rather gullible person, which is why Amar and Prem find it easy to manipulate him. He sports a curling mustache in an attempt to look masculine, and always enters the scene wearing dark shades and by jump-scaring people because that is the first impact he wants to have. His costume (which is almost all-black because 'evil') has a cape. Gogo doesn't want to be just a villain, he wants to be a super-villain. Gogo seems to have had a traumatic childhood. He looks like someone who was bullied at school, and at home, he never got the respect of his family because he failed to be a menace to society. His entire life has been a constant endeavor to make his family proud of him by being a notorious bad-guy. His title, 'Crime Master', was definitely self-imposed in an attempt to associate his personality with anti-law. He would be a mockery among the criminal world. Gogo has two signature lines. – "Aaya hoon, kuch toh leke hi jaunga. Khandani chor hoon." – This is a reminder he needs to keep giving everyone. His usage of his criminal family and relationship with Mogambo is generally a futile attempt at trying to induce fear. – "Aankhein nikaal ke gotiyaan khelunga" – This, to be honest, is a little disturbing. I have a strong feeling that someone in his family has literally done this in front of him sometime during his childhood, and that left him scarred. In the climax, we see Gogo get badly beaten up by his own men during the pande
monium around the diamonds. He isn't able to deliver a single punch in return and gets roughed up the way he probably did in childhood. It won't be surprising if after the movie he accepts all of those men back with a hug if they appeal to his emotional side. . #characterbiopsies #crimemastergogo #andazapnaapnahara #aamirkhan #salmankhan

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Meet Neville Longbottom, the unsung hero. Neville embodies the true value of being a Gryffindor more than anyone else. Bravery does not mean seeking out trouble. It means not shying away when faced with it. Neville chooses to fight in spite of being scared. And that is true courage. When he was sorted in Gryffindor, he seemed a misfit. But over the seven books, we see how hardly any other Gryffindor deserves to be in the house more than him. Who could have guessed that the meekly and hopeless fat kid from the first book would be leading a rebellion against Voldemort by the end? Neville's parent situation is, in my opinion, way worse than Harry's. Seeing your parents so tortured and ruined in their minds that they completely fail to recognize you is way more disturbing than seeing your parents getting killed as a newborn. . (‘– poor devils,’ growled Moody. ‘Better dead than what happened to them…’) . Neville was brought up by his tyrannizing grandmother whose constant remarks and treatment of him kept his confidence to the lowest. And this low self-esteem is the reason he kept forgetting passwords and losing his toad frequently in the beginning, and also struggled to perform magic as well as others. Neville grows up being much sorted in his head. He does not use his traumatizing past as an excuse for unruly behaviour at every opportunity, unlike Harry. Neville picks his fights and shows grit when most needed, be it standing up to his own friends Harry, Ron, and Hermione, to Crabbe and Goyle, to the Carrows, or to Voldemort himself. . (‘You show spirit, and bravery, and you come of noble stock. You will make a very valuable Death Eater. We need your kind, Neville Longbottom.’ ‘I’ll join you when hell freezes over,’ said Neville.) . When the DA classes begin, Neville is one of the worst with his spe
lls. But he does not give up, because that's his nature. He keeps persistently trying till he gets good at it. Neville's character grows so beautifully from the kid who was assumed to be a Squib by his family, to an underperforming, Herbology-loving, clumsy student, to the guy who slices Nagini's head and makes Voldemort mortal again. #characterbiopsies #harrypotter

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Meet Piku Banerjee. Piku is one of my favorite Bollywood characters ever written, mainly because there are so many dimensions to her personality. She is an architect, a boss, and a homemaker; she likes to play badminton, and is a Satyajit Ray fan; she is bad-tempered and difficult to deal with (a quirk she gets from her father); she is extremely progressive (father) and yet respects tradition (mother); she recognizes sex more as a need than a want, and hence has a friend-with-benefit while she dates other men in search of an emotional companion; she is highly opinionated, at times to the point of being stubborn (how she refuses to give in to the client's demands), and she nurtures an unshakeable love for her father. Piku is all of this, and yet she is an 'everywoman'. . Piku effortlessly fills into the traditional roles of being the man of the house as well as being the woman. She has to juggle so many balls in a day that she rarely gets time for herself, which is why we always see her rushing around, even inside her house. If you meet Piku, she most certainly will come across rude. She can't help it, and she doesn't care. She has a lot of personal shit (pun intended) to deal with to care about offending other people. Piku doesn't have a love life, and her father is a strong reason behind this. She loves her father, understands his needs and manages his cantankerous nature, but she also realizes that any man who comes into her life will need to put up with this baggage of hers, and no one probably will. This is why she manages to find faults in every guy she dates, and also the first tiny spark between her and Rana happens only after her father passes away. Piku embodies the true essence of feminism. If you were to ask her whether she is a feminist, she would probably say she isn't sure. Piku would
never give a good thought to trying to be a feminist because she would be busy being one. A feminist, much like a Hero, is something you are, not something you tag yourself as. Only your subconscious actions and thoughts, that are mostly products of your upbringing, can make you progressive in the true sense. #characterbiopsies #piku

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As I’ve mentioned, you’ll be thanking us for this, but you can do that later. Go on, browse through @characterbiopsies and fall in love with characters that you love, love-to-hate but can’t get over.

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