Social Distancing—What You Need To Be Doing During This Crucial Time

Natasha Patel , 17 Mar 2020
Social Distancing during Coronavirus By Steven Urquhart | www.shutterstock.com

Okay, story-time! Here goes… While trying to be hella‘ productive with the time I have (since our office has us working from home this week) I figured that going for a run last evening was the best way to clear my mind from all the Coronavirus clutter. Now picture this, it’s 6:45 pm, the sun has almost set and it’s getting dark on Marine Drive. As I start to warm up with my brisk walk (LOL yeah, granny-central right?) I look around to find people leaving the curb! Literally, people start getting up and walking away.

And while this was alarming for a second, I gave things a minute to then find that the local police officers had started asking the usual large scale of people who love to just sit and watch the ocean, to move away unless they were working out—whether they wore masks or not. This suddenly made me feel incredibly safe and made me realise the true essence of social distancing.

What is Social Distancing really?

In simple words, it’s the distance we need to maintain between ourselves and people around us. But that’s not all. We also need to minimise contact with people on public transportation, limit our travel, whether it’s to or from work, and social gatherings. And most definitely to stay away from crowded areas.

That being said, there’s still a lot of misunderstanding. People still are under the notion that if they’re healthy, they’re practically immune to the virus as it only attacks the older generation of people. There is no doubt that older people and those with health conditions already are most vulnerable to the virus, but by no means does that make younger people safe.

Let’s talk a little about how this virus works shall we?

Think of the virus as a flame, the more you come in contact with it (great immunity or not) the more rapidly it grows and spreads. Most of the people who contract the virus might show mild symptoms at first, but they could pass on that mild virus to a high-risk person causing their health to take a hit and the pandemic to grow.

This graph will give you guys a little more perspective…

View this post on Instagram

Why you need to stop going to bars, restaurants, and public gatherings.⁣ ⁣ I just canceled our upcoming flights, hotels, AirBnbs, and restaurant reservations. We’re staying put. Yes, in Seattle of all places.⁣ ⁣ It was really tempting to follow through with our flight plans anyway, because it’s not like I really want to be in Seattle right now—and there’s not yet a ban on travel within the country, so I COULD fly if I wanted to. But if we wait until the government restricts travel, it’s already too late to have a positive effect.⁣ ⁣ I want to look back on this time and know I did everything I possibly could. If my contribution to slowing the spread and flattening the curve ends up resulting in someone saying I “overreacted”, so be it. I’m happy to hear it.⁣ ⁣ Overreacting leads to people thinking you overreacted. Underreacting leads to people thinking you underreacted.⁣ ⁣ #covid19 #coronavirus #socialdistancing #FlattenTheCurve

A post shared by Sean McCabe (@seanwes) on

FYI: Social Distancing does not mean Self Quarantine:

Most of us that read articles, forwards and watch the news know that information can be questionable at times, especially on social media. Which is why people start freaking out when they hear the words social distancing. But why? While there is a slight overlap between the distancing and quarantine, they’re far from being the same. Self-quarantine simply means self-monitoring. Keeping a close eye on your body temperature and overall health. While distancing means removing yourself from the equation completely so that you’re not in frequent contact with people who aren’t your immediate family. It’s a precautionary measure, not complete isolation. That’s why a lot of companies have declared a work-from-home given this situation.

5 Tips While You Work From Home:

  1. Set a routine or map out a plan for the day.
  2. Shower and get ready like you normally would on any usual office-going day.
  3. Create a dedicated space to work from. Working from our sofas or beds will just make us lazy.
  4. Take a break once in a while. Watch a show, cook, play some music and relax.
  5. Get up and move—go for a walk or a run at least once a day. Or workout from home.

Let’s start being a little more mindful, shall we?

Follow us for more daily updates!

Related Stories

Related Stories

More Better Living